Sherman Hill

Kudos to the City Council

...for upholding the Historic Preservation Commission in a dispute with heavy hitters James and Roxanne Conlin over installation of vinyl windows in a building they own that is located in a local historic district. Rumor has it they may take the issue to court. Such a waste of time and money would be a shame. I suggest they put the money they might spend on attorneys and court costs into renovating their building and complying with the local historic district ordinance.

Staff in the planning department deserve a lot of credit as well. They wrote a staff response to the Conlin appeal, and it is a great read for all preservationists and city government nerds.

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Conlin Properties

24 Sep 2012

826 18th Street - Conlin Properties: From the Assessor's website826 18th Street - James and Roxanne Conlin: From the Assessor's websiteIn a few minutes, James Conlin (yes, related to Des Moines attorney Roxanne Conlin) will ask [pdf] the Des Moines City Council to overturn a decision made by the Historic Preservation Commission relating to one of their properties in the Sherman Hill local historic district.

The property is located at 826 18th Street. The local historic district has been in existence since before the Conlins purchased the property in 1989. They want to install vinyl windows in conflict with the Historic Preservation Commission's interpretation of the established local historic district guidelines.

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The Filling Station

Listed in the 2008 Des Moines Rehabbers Club "Most Endangered" list, the former Don's Service Station structure has been sitting on cribs in the Kathedral parking lot for four years... The Sherman Hill website now reports that it is finally scheduled to be moved to its permanent home at 18th and Crocker. For more information about the planned conversion to a teen hangout and worship center, visit the "Filling Station" website.

Downtown Development Plans...

KCCI reports that Hubbell Realty Company has initiated the public process for development incentives and zoning approvals for "Cityville", a 288-unit mixed-use complex to be built just south of downtown. Unfortunately, the available news reports were unclear which incentives are being pursued, with various references to tax abatement, loans, tax credits, grants, and tax increment financing. Surely Hubbell will negotiate with the city economic development department to hammer out the specifics - citizens need to be vigilant to ensure that we are getting a good deal.

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There are two primary types of historic districts: National Register historic districts and local historic districts.

Historic Home, 1940'sHistoric Home, 1940'sLocal historic districts like Owl's Head and Sherman Hill in Des Moines require that exterior improvements meet certain standards, as interpreted by the Historic Preservation Commission. In a local historic district, for example, a property owner cannot alter fencing, siding, windows, or porches without a "Certificate of Appropriateness" being issued.

National Register historic districts are essentially all "carrot" and no "stick". The myth that the government will restrict what property owners can do to their privately held buildings in a National Register historic district is as persistent as it is false. In a National Register District, one can install vinyl siding, add an ugly porch, even demolish their house if so desired!

The "carrot" is Historic Tax Credits. Qualifying renovation work on buildings that contribute to the historic district is eligible for a refundable state income tax credit of up to 25% (and in some cases an additional Federal tax credit of up to 20%)! In my experience, there is no development tool more effective for spurring sustainable neighborhood reinvestment. Not only does renovation have the direct benefit of returning vacant and underutilized properties back to use, but it also has the associated benefits of raising property values, directing investment back to developing neighborhoods, paying of local wages and material purchase among others.

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